Memorial Day

I hope you are enjoying the weekend with friends and family.

Please take a moment to think of the fallen heroes. Whether they fought for their families, or ideals of God and country, or simply because they were called and did not run, they were brave.

They deserve to have their too brief lives remembered.

Today I am thinking of a song DH and some of his classmates sing. It was popular during World War I, but probably originated earlier. There are many different versions. Below is one I’ve cobbled together from DH and some other sources. There is also a lengthier version here.

Stand to Your Glasses

We meet ‘neath the sounding rafters,
The walls around us bare;
As they shout back our peals of laughter;
It seems the dead are there.

So, stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies.
Here’s a health to the dead already;
And here’s to the next man who dies.

Cut off from the land that bore us,
Betayed by the land we find,
The good men have gone before us
Only the dull left behind

So, stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies.
Here’s a health to the dead already;
And here’s to the next man who dies.

There’s dew on the glass congealing,
‘Tis the Hurricane’s blasted breath.
It is thus that the warmth of feeling,
Grows cold in the grasp of death.

So, stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies.
Here’s a health to the dead already;
And here’s to the next man who dies.

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6 comments

  1. kbug says:

    I’d never heard this one before, but I can understand why soldiers would sing it…to help them deal with the loss of friends and honor them. We should all lift a glass to our fallen troops on this day…

  2. kbug says:

    I’d never heard this one before, but I can understand why soldiers would sing it…to help them deal with the loss of friends and honor them. We should all lift a glass to our fallen troops on this day…

  3. kbug says:

    I’d never heard this one before, but I can understand why soldiers would sing it…to help them deal with the loss of friends and honor them. We should all lift a glass to our fallen troops on this day…

  4. kbug says:

    I’d never heard this one before, but I can understand why soldiers would sing it…to help them deal with the loss of friends and honor them. We should all lift a glass to our fallen troops on this day…

  5. kbug says:

    I’d never heard this one before, but I can understand why soldiers would sing it…to help them deal with the loss of friends and honor them. We should all lift a glass to our fallen troops on this day…

  6. Mack says:

    The tune is very old and comes, some say, from the Scots border. The words were put down by some British soldier during the cholera pandemic of the 1830’s when the disease burned its way throgh the garrisons of the Queen’s and the HEIC troops. From there it entered the repetoire of British soldier songs. It was very common o hear this tune being whisted by soldiers or sung in messes of UK forces on the Western Front in WW1. There is a dramatically staged presentation of it in ‘Dawn Patrol’. The clear inference being all the men signing are living on borrowed time and very soon they will be ‘the next man to die’. In WW2 this song made its reappearance in the crew rooms and messes of Bomber Command for very good reasons. I heard it sung once while in Viet Nam by a Scots serving in US forces.