How hard is it to plan an Easter egg hunt?

I appreciate all the hard work volunteers and paid staff put in to make Holidays special for local kids. I truly do. And I also understand that there are a thousand and one little details that go into making large events a success because I have planned them before myself. So please believe me when I say that I know I am lucky to have so many fun events in my area.

But how hard is it to plan an Easter egg hunt?

One where every kid under five gets at least one egg. One where the parents don’t have to wait on line for an hour.

We went to two Easter egg hunts Easter weekend.

At the first, there were enough eggs for every kid (smart) and staggered times (even smarter) but because you did not sign up for or get assigned a time, you had to get on line and wait and wait and wait. Once we got in, all but one of the eggs were empty. One egg had a sticker to be exchanged for a big basket. The rest of the kids dumped their eggs in a plastic bag (to be reset) and then picked up candy. Even my three year old seemed to think it was a long walk for a short drink of water.

The second Easter egg hunt was supposed to take place at the end of a parade. One area was for the under fours and the other area was for the older children. Except other kids were alread at the egg hunt and when the kids who participated in the parade go there, they had no idea where to go. By the time we got to the under four area, the very few eggs were being snatched up by kids, many of whom appeared to be at least seven, right in front of my daughter’s eyes.

So, in my world, here’s how you do it:

  • The staggered times are great for a festival–but let people take a ticket for their chosen time and then walk around so they don’t miss the rest of the fun.
  • If everyone is going to look for eggs together, then hold the line until people arrive–don’t let some jump the gun before most of the participants have gotten to the area.
  • Put something in each egg.
  • Post clear signs both about the age ranges for the areas and the number of eggs kids should take. There is no reason to let an older kid grab ten eggs when some little kids who actually believe in the Easter Bunny have no eggs.
  • For the littlest ones, let the parents have a two or three eggs to drop right in front of their kids.

Of course, I’m not holding out for better-planned events. We’ll know to bring our own eggs for the kids next time.

But just one, simple request: get a less freaky costume for your Easter bunny. That’s some Donnie Darko stuff right there:

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